Elderly & Disabled

Jul 10, 2019 | by user

Why Focus On Elderly & Disabled Care?

Mankind has now better and quicker access to quality medical services across the globe. Medical science has made great strides over the years, as a result not only has the mortality rates reduced, people across the world are living longer. The World Health Organisation, in one of its reports, estimates the global elderly population – above the age of 60 – to double by 2050. 

The elderly of the world have access to better medical services but despite the progress, inequalities exist. 

“While older persons on average have greater health care needs than younger age groups, they also face distinct disadvantages in accessing appropriate, affordable and quality care,” the UN states in one of its webpages. 

The World Health Organisation calls for “radical societal change” in the wake of an increasing number of elderly people across the globe. 

“‘World report on ageing and health 2015’ finds that there is very little evidence that the added years of life are being experienced in better health than was the case for previous generations at the same age,” as stated by WHO on its website. 

In the wake of rapid population ageing, the need to address age-related inequalities become even more urgent. 

“‘World report on ageing and health 2015’ finds that there is very little evidence that the added years of life are being experienced in better health than was the case for previous generations at the same age,”

 

 

 

 

 

ELDERLY & DISABLED CARE IN SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GOALS

Disability often comes with old-age and ailments tied to ageing. The United Nations, through its various programmes and initiatives, aims to strengthen the rights of those with a disability and provide a better quality of life to them.

United Nations ‘Flagship Report on Disability and Development 2018 – Realizing the SDGs’ shows that “people with disabilities are at a disadvantage regarding most Sustainable Development Goals”.

It is found that people with disabilities often face discrimination, feel isolated and disconnected. The UN, the World Health Organisation and other international bodies, therefore, call for a unified plan to provide better care to the elderly population of the world as well as address the challenges faced by those with a disability. 

 

ELDERLY & DISABLED CARE IN INDONESIA

In Indonesia, the number of people ageing 60 years and above accounts for nearly 8 per cent of the total population – a figure that is estimated to climb to around 16 per cent by 2035. 

“Disability also increases significantly with age, with 26 per cent of the older population being affected. The proportion of the older population reporting a disability in 2010 was 28.2 per cent among older women,

compared to 23.4 per cent among older men,” states a 2014 United Nations Population Fund report on Indonesia. 

Under its 2030 agenda, the UN aims social, economic and political inclusion of all, including people with disabilities – “leaving no one behind”.  

United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goal (3) ‘Good Health and Wellbeing’ focuses on promoting well-being for all at all ages – with or without a disability. Under the goal, countries across the globe are urged to take up programmes and initiatives to provide adequate medical and healthcare facilities to the elderly as well as address issues related to neglect, abuse and violence against the ageing and the disabled population of the world. 

UN SDGs converge Indonesia’s ‘Nine Aspirations’ or national development goals called Nawa Cita laid down by the Indonesian President Joko Widodo.

ELDERLY & DISABLED CARE, AND ARTEMIS IMPACT

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